School of Journalism > Prospective Students > Travel Programs > International > Reporting Australia > Lamington National Park — The Subtropical Rainforest
  • Krisopher Wilson, Ph.D.
  • Reporting on our Changing Environment: Queensland, Australia

Lamington National Park — The Subtropical Rainforest

Welcome to Lamington National Park, or as some recognize it, "Wangerriburra Park" meaning "a place of peace."

A Look at Lamington

Along the Queensland and New South Wales border in Australia lies 20,600 hectares (51,000 acres) of preserved rainforest land and a national park. Paths throughout the park reveal towering trees, streams and waterfalls and a diverse range of wildlife. These photos show a peek of the ancient and mysterious Lamington National Park.
Lamington National Park and surrounding areas


Timeline of the Park

From the breaking up of supercontinent Gondwana to one man's passionate quest to save the rainforest, Lamington National Park has a colorful history. The timeline presentation below dives into how the park became what it is today and about Binna Burra Mountain Lodge, the quaint resort inside of it.


Lamington Then and Now

Barry Davies discusses some of the history behind Lamington National Park, how it has changed in the last few decades and how important birds are to the balance of the forest.


Small and Mighty: Why Figs are Crucial to the Rainforest

Fig trees are abundant in Lamington National Park, and without them and the tiny animal living inside, the balance of the park would be destroyed and the forest may not be able to survive. Click here to see more about rainforest figs.


Invasive Species and What They Mean for Australia's Environment

Biologist and science writer Tim Low discusses the role and impact of invasive species in Australia.